4 October 2014

Following the Revolution trail.

Our day started on Thursday early as we had a fair way to go and lots to see. Getting out of Boston was OK and we soon found the route we wanted to get to Lexington. This is where the American Revolution started and where the first shots were exchanged between the Regular English Troops and the American Militia or Minute Men, who in reality were all farmers.

The monument in Lexington


























We found the town quite quaint and it had much of the 18th century charm with its buildings and monuments. One has to say that the Americans take great pride in their short history and sometimes lay it on a bit thick. 























When Alan found a shop named after George's wife he just had to take a photograph of it too. On the other side of the street was a nice little coffee shop where even us bears were allowed to sit and enjoy the view out the window.























From here we followed the trail to Concord where:
                                                                                             
                                               By the road bridge that arched the flood,                                                             
Their flag to April's breeze unfurled,
Here once the embattled farmers stood,
And fired the shot heard round the World.

We also visited the Sleepy Hollow Cemetery where the author of the poem, The Concord Hymn, Thomas Waldo Emerson is buried.

Then it was off into the wild blue yonder to follow the Mohawk Trail to Buffalo.
On the way we passed the birthplace of John Chapman, otherwise known as Johnny Appleseed, so we stopped and had a free apple.

The journey from here on was stop and go as there were lots of nice views to photograph, not always easy as the roads were not meant to be stopped on!!









The last few views were taken from a restaurant where we stopped to watch the sunset and have our evening meal. 


Then it was on into the dark to Albany.

Here in the Red Roof Motel we lay down our weary head for the night.